Dale Zarrella – the Eye of an Artist

Dale Zarrella’s next project is a statue of Mother (now Saint) Marianne of Molokai. Mother Marianne arrived at Kalaupapa (the leper colony) on Molokai in 1888 after Father Damien contracted leprosy. She tended the dying Father Damien then took over his work for the remainder of her long life. The statue of Marianne will join Dale’s life-size statue of Saint Damien in the Father Damien Museum in Honolulu.

On the left is the Monkey Pod tree trunk that will become Dale's next statute. The image on the right  shows Dale's plaster study for Marianne superimposed over the tree trunk. The half-size plaster study is enlarged here to give an idea of what will emerge from the wood.

On the left is the Monkey Pod tree trunk that will become Dale’s next statue. The image on the right shows Dale’s plaster study for Saint Marianne superimposed over the tree trunk. The half-size plaster study is enlarged here to give an idea of what will emerge from the wood.

Click here, here, here, and here, to see other examples of Dale’s work.

South Kihei Beach Walk

South Kihei Beach Walk MapSouth Kihei has some great beaches where you can walk for miles. This 90 minute walk starts and ends at Charley Young Beach, across the street from our condo at Maui Vista. The round trip is about 3 miles – so the pace is leisurely.

 

Most of the walk is on sand but there are a few places where you’ll want sandals.

 

Don’t forget the sunscreen and be sure to carry water.

 

 

Charley Young Beach

Charley Young Beach

 

 

Start at the north end of Charley Young Beach near these rocks.

About halfway down the beach, Charley Young becomes Kamaole Beach Park I.

Note that all three Kamaole parks have lifeguards, restrooms and showers.

Kamaole Beach II

Kamaole Beach II

 

 

Take the sandy path at the south end of the beach and use the short public access pathway on the makai (water) side of the Royal Mauian Condos to get to Kamaole Beach II.

Check the water as you pass the Royal Mauian. You can often see turtles swimming and feeding off the point.

 

Kamaole Beach III

Kamaole Beach III

You may want your sandals at the south end of Kamaole II as you climb the short slope to the large grassy park of Kamaole III.

On the weekends, this park is a favorite place for local families to host children’s birthday parties.

You can walk through the park on the grass or return to the beach.

 

 

6 - Kihei boat ramp

Kihei Boat Ramp

The south end of Kamaole III is about a mile from the start of this walk. You can turn around here or put on your sandals for an entirely different experience.

If you continue on, stay on the paths that crisscross this natural area – it’s a nesting habitat for the Wedge-tailed Shearwater. You’ll soon see the jetty at the Kihei Boat Ramp.

 

7 - south of boat ramp

Path from the boat ramp to the Kihei Surfside

Walk under the shade trees on the makai side of the boat ramp parking lot. Cross the boat ramp and look for the path just to the right of the paved driveway with the “Do Not Enter” sign.

As you round the corner of this short delightful path you’ll come to the grounds of the Kihei Surfside resort. The public access pathway is next to the water.

Keawakapu Beach

Keawakapu Beach

 

Continue on the boardwalk past the tall Mana Kai Maui Resort and the 5 Palms Restaurant to the north end of Keawakapu Beach.

Turn around here or, if you’re really ambitious, stroll down Keawakapu Beach. It’s another mile to Ulua Beach – just past the last bit of sandy beach in the distance.

Maunalei Arboretum and Mahana Ridge Trail

UNFORTUNATELY, CONVENIENT ACCESS TO THIS HIKE IS NO LONGER POSSIBLE. HERE’S THE INITIAL WRITE UP:

This lengthy but mostly shady hike takes you through beautiful and diverse vegetation with occasional spectacular views into the lush West Maui Mountains and out to the blue Pacific and the islands of Lanai and Molokai.

Entering Maunalei Arboretum

Entering Maunalei Arboretum

The first mile of this 6.5 mile hike is uphill – not steep, but always up. The remainder is mainly downhill with short uphill stretches. Parts of the trail may be muddy, so wear appropriate walking/hiking shoes. You’ll be in the shade until the last mile or so where the sun can feel very hot. If it has rained recently, there may be slippery places. Allow 3+ hours. Bring snacks and plenty of water.

View of the watershed

View of the watershed

IMG_1036 IMG_1041

View to the ocean

View to the ocean

IMG_1055 A free shuttle takes you from the Kapalua Resort Adventure Center to the trail head. There is no other way to get there except by hiking the trail backwards, which is not recommended. Call the Adventure Center (808 665-4386) for driving directions, departure times, and to reserve a place on the shuttle. The trail ends at D. T. Fleming Park and beach, a short walk from the Adventure Center where you left your car.

D. T. Fleming Beach

D. T. Fleming Beach

 

Longs Drugs – Not your average drug store

longsdrugs

Groceries at the drug store?

At first glance, Longs Drugs in North Kihei seems like any other chain drug store, but slow down and take a closer look. Long’s has a local feel – particularly around the outside aisles. There are MANY Maui products at generally good prices.

 

 

Maui Beef2Check out the grass fed Maui raised beef at the back of the store. The ground beef is a full two dollars per pound less than the few other stores that carry it. Directly across from the beef coolers are shelves with locally grown produce at about half the cost as grocery stores. While prices are decent, see our blog on Rowena’s Farmer’s Market. Her produce variety and prices are even better.
Maui Burger Buns2

 

 

 

 

Don’t overlook the Hawaiian bakery products up front near the check-out stands, including some whole wheat buns to go with that Maui beef.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

roselani-ice-cream2

 

 

Also up front are half-gallons of awesome made-on-Maui Roselani ice cream (Mac nut is our fave, but the Kona Mud is pretty darn good also.)

 

 

 

Melona BarsAnother family favorite are the unbelievably delicious Melona Bars (go for the honeydew or mango.) Melona bars are actually made in Korea, but are not usually available on “the Mainland”. We won’t kid you, the non-sale price for ice-cream will send you into sticker-shock. If you’d prefer cheaper prices, see our posts under the category “Shop Like A Local.”

 

 

 

 

In other areas of the store, check-out the popular Maui Babe tanning lotion, flip-flops called Locals, books on Hawaiian fish, birds and cooking. There’s even a center aisle with many Hawaiian food products such as hot sauces, spices and dry goods. On Fridays, Longs receives a few bunches of world famous Hawaiian Protea flowers and sells them for just $6.  There are also tons of souvenirs, but they’re pretty much the same as what you’ll find at ABC Stores and WalMart…convenient, but nothing special and a bit higher priced.

Bring the whole family and let everyone explore the store. You’ll be amazed what they come up with. You can’t go wrong with Longs. It’s a local favorite and it’s not your average drug store. Hint: Longs is part of the CVS chain. If you don’t have a “club card” just ask for one and they’ll give you the sale price.

What to Buy at the Maui Costco

ImageMany Maui visitors like to swing by the Maui Costco right after they get off the plane. (At the first major intersection, look for the red stripe along the building on your left at Diary Road. ) Things cost about 10% more than at other Costco’s which is not bad considering you’re on an island. Although we’ve blogged before on the advantages of shopping at Costco, here are some specific things we like to buy:

  1. Coffee. At the time of this posting a two pound bag of Maui Coffee Roaster beans is $16. Other brands are also available at good prices. You can grind the beans near the checkout stands. Just ask your cashier. (We also keep a grinder in our condo for those that prefer a “daily grind”.)
  2. Booze. The liquor seems super cheap to us, but not the wine. Places such as Long Drugs and WalMart have better wine prices and a larger selection. Beer tends to be a bit cheaper at Costco.
  3. Sushi and poke’! That’s right. The Maui Costco has a sushi/poke’ bar. We like the Spicey Tuna. (see photo)  Hint: Buy something frozen (such as chicken) and use it to keep perishables cold til you reach your destination.
  4. Milk and yogurt. Cheaper at Costco, but in general, dairy products on Maui are very expensive. Think about whether you will really use the Costco sizes of these products in the tropics. You haven’t saved money if you end up throwing it away.
  5. Gasoline. You won’t need this when you first arrive, but if you need gas while here and you’re going to be anywhere near Costco, it’s a whopping forty to ninety! cents less per gallon.
  6. Juice and water. Hawaii has a five cent container deposit, so buy a few large containers, not a bunch of little ones. (Note: Maui’s water comes from the mountains and we find the water at our condo quite good. We do not buy bottled water and provide refillable water bottles at the condo.)
  7.  Fresh fish/meats/ lunch meats/cheeses…all a good deal.
  8. Pre-cooked pulled pork in the deli section. Just heat and serve. We like to make a bunch of cole-slaw and dress it with bar b q sauce on a hamburger roll. It’s Hawaiian!
  9. Bread/hamburger rolls/bagels. Much cheaper and very useful if your condo has a gas grill (like ours.)
  10. Chips and salsa!
  11. Pineapples! Maui pineapples are $3. Sliced and grilled is wonderful.

Like our list? Feel free to print it and take it with you to Costco. If there is there is something you’ve bought at the Maui Costco you think we should add to the list, please comment below.

See the fish without getting wet – Maui Aquarium

MOC 2

Want to see an amazing collection of tropical fish, but you don’t want to snorkel or scuba dive? Maybe you’ve had enough of the beach and the heat for awhile and you’re looking for something different. Or – heaven forbid – it’s raining and you need an indoor activity. If any of these apply, try the Maui Ocean Center – aka the Maui Aquarium – at Maalaea Bay.

The Maui Ocean Center has a fabulous collection of tropical fish and sea life: octopus, sharks, sea horses, shrimp, coral, turtles, and a rainbow of fish both large and small. It’s easy to find, just take the road to Lahaina and look for the signs. Admission in 2013/14 is $25.50 for adults and $18.50 for children through age 12.

Hammer head shark

Hammer head shark

 

MOC 15

Sea horse

Sea horse

Black tip reef shark

Black tip reef shark

MOC 10

Moray eel

Moray eel

Octopus - note ink

Frightened octopus – note ink

 

Stand-Up Paddle Boarding at Kalama Park

Paddle boarding is easy

Paddle boarding is easy (even standing up)

In addition to surfboard rentals and surfing lessons, you can rent stand-up paddle boards and take lessons at the south end of Kalama Park, just a few blocks from our Maui Vista condo. Go in the morning when the wave action and wind are down. There are several trucks from which you can rent equipment, or you rent from Maui Wave Riders located across the street. Maui Wave Riders also provides lessons.

Lots of turtles off Kalama Park

Lots of turtles off Kalama Park

I’m not sure if it’s really necessary to take a lesson to learn to paddle board. I did and didn’t regret it, but it cost $65 for the board rental plus a “lesson” that lasted all of five minutes. On the other hand, the instructor was always with us and he took us to a great spot over turtle reef. Lots of turtles there. They’ll surface right next to you and swim under your board.

Turtle Reef – Even Better Than Turtle Town

Lots of turtles at Turtle Reef

Lots of turtles at Turtle Reef

The commercial snorkeling boats don’t stop at Turtle Reef located 300-400 yards off Kalama Park in Kihei. Perhaps the water is too shallow or there is too much going on in the vicinity – like surfing and stand-up paddle boarding. Maybe it’s too “urban.” (We’re talking south/central Kihei here, not pristine Makena landing.) For whatever reason the big boats don’t go, don’t let it stop you from visiting Turtle Reef.

There are several great ways to get there. (Unless you are a VERY strong swimmer, swimming from shore isn’t one of them.) We’ve been there by stand-up paddle board and kayak. Others use a surf board. You can rent any of these from Maui Wave Riders (across the street from the south end of Kalama Park) or other nearby outfits.

The reef is large and there are turtles everywhere – especially in the morning when the turtles like to feed and the water is calm. As you can see from the map, Turtle Reef is close to our condo at Maui Vista. We launched our kayak at Charley Young Beach and paddled over.

Turtle Reef Map

If at first you don’t see turtles, keep looking. When you get in the right spot you’ll see them everywhere. I’ve counted as many at 12 turtle heads out of the water near my stand-up paddle board at a time. They get so close they may bump into you.

Turtle reef 6

Despite the temptation, please don’t touch the turtles – bad karma. If you like, bring snorkel gear to get an even better view!

Two youngsters and a baby turtle

Two youngsters and a baby turtle

While Turtle Reef is terrific, Turtle Town is great as well. click here to see our post on Turtle Town.

West Maui Hiking – The Kapalua Coastal Trail

Kapalua Coastal Trail Map

Kapalua Coastal Trail Map

The Kapalua Coastal Trail is an easy, beautiful walk along the northwest coast of Maui. The trail starts at the public access parking lot for Kapalua Beach and winds a mile and a half along the coast to D. T. Fleming Beach. Both the beginning and end of the trail are paved. In between there are sections of gravel, dirt, and boardwalk. By far the most spectacular part of the trail is the first two-thirds – from Kapalua Beach to Oneloa Beach.

Kapalua Bay

Kapalua Bay

The “trail head,” if you can call it that, is up the short flight of  stairs in the picture to the right. You could take a stroller or wheelchair on this part of the walk.

Alternatively, you can walk along the beach and access the trail later.

Namalu Bay

Namalu Bay

Along the way you’ll see beautiful beaches, rugged coastlines, native plants, lots of turtles, and multi-million dollar homes, condos, and resorts.

The path out to the end of the point (shown in the map above) is well worth the modest extra effort.

Rugged little coves form the west end of Oneloa Bay. Watch closely and you’ll see turtles surface for air and glide through the water below you.

Look for turtles in the coves at the west end of Oneloa Bay

Look for turtles in the coves at the west end of Oneloa Bay

Oneloa Beach

Oneloa Beach

Oneloa Beach is a lovely stretch of sand with good snorkeling. Wear your swim suit and carry some snorkeling gear and a towel.

The trail turns inland at the east end of Oneloa Bay where is meets up with the Lower Honoapiilani Road. Here the “trail” is actually a sidewalk. Not so interesting here. Just past the Ritz-Carlton wedding chapel, the trail becomes a path through the grounds of the resort, finally winding down to D. T. Fleming Beach.

DT Fleming BeachReturn to your car the way you came. It’s just as nice going the other way.

GETTING THERE: Drive north from Lahaina to milepost 29, turn left at the stoplight and head makai (toward the ocean). Turn right at the T-intersection onto Lower Honoapiilani Road. Look for the beach access sign just past the Napili Kai Beach Resort.

For information on other hikes on Maui click here for Hana – Oheo Gulch and the Pipiwai Trail, or Hiking La Parouse Bay, or Haleakala – the Halemaluu Trail, or Haleakala – the Sliding Sands Trail.

When to Shop (Like a Local!)

RowenaWhen to shop is just as important as where to shop. First, consider the priorities of the day. If you are planning to go to the beach, shop in the afternoon when the trade winds kick-up. However, do not shop too late in the afternoon because you will be winding your way through very crowded aisles and long lines along with the zillions of other visitors going after the evening’s food and bev. If you’re going after fresh produce, see our other blog on Rowena’s Farmers Market and go in the morning when the selection is best.

In general, try to limit shopping to weekdays when the stores are less crowded. In fact, if you are going to Costco, consider going in the morning before the planes arrive from the mainland. It’s much more crowded after noon.

It only takes a few times of being in a grocery store at five pm and finding the farmer’s market closed in the late afternoon to fine tune when to shop.